Climbing the Lord’s Mountain

We occasionally hear the phrase “climbing the Lord’s mountain” as we read the Bible. For Israel, it is a joyous and triumphant vision of how people often go up the mountain of Jerusalem, where on at the top stood the Temple. People go “up” in order to visit the Temple of the Lord and offer their worship. Climbing here is more than mountaineering; it comes with it a liturgical and ritual nuance.

Humans are naturally attracted to heights. Heights afford us a splendid view of what’s below and a panoramic vista of the world. In many cultures, tops of mountains have always been believed to be places where we meet the divinity. The highest point of earth kisses the heavens at the peak of mountains. Human as we are, we have always been attracted to the heavens, the transcendent, the beautiful, and thus the heights.

This willingness to go up and the attraction of the Divine is what makes climbing the Lord’s mountain beautiful. Besides these, there is also the sense of belongingness to a people called together to worship. For a pilgrim Israelite going up the steady slope it must have been a view to see others who belong to the same people but from other places congregating together towards a single point of destination. There is a sense of reunion, coming back, and being together.

Climbing the Lord’s mountain then could also be an invitation for us to reclaim our identity. We are a people called by God to meet Him in His temple. Isaiah’s vision, so often quoted during this Advent season, envisions the peoples of the world coming to Jerusalem. God manifests Himself to the world and calls everyone to Himself. Going up that mountain means responding to that call and reclaiming that identity of being desired by God.

Life too can be seen as a continuous and many times arduous climb up that mountain. We struggle along the way but we push on coming closer to our greatest desire. The invitation of the prophet resounds this advent season, “come, let us climb the Lord’s mountain.” Let us go together and meet the Lord, and in His Temple, Jesus Christ, offer Him praise and worship.

Disclaimer: This section of the website is a personal creative writing of the author and does not necessarily reflect the official views, opinion, or policies of the Salesians of Don Bosco – Philippines South Province. For concerns on the content, style, and grammar of this piece, please contact us.

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